Study Participation

Per University directives to caution regarding the covid-19, all studies are suspended until further notice.

We will continue to recruit for our 7T study; scheduling for in-person visits is on hold.


Want to know more about what a study visit is like? Read the book below to find out from someone who visited the lab themself!

  • Title page with the test "Scientists studied my brain! at the Laboratory of Neurocognitive Development", over a purple background with an image of a blue-gloved hand holding a miniature brain with rays of light shooting out.
    Title page with the test "Scientists studied my brain! at the Laboratory of Neurocognitive Development", over a purple background with an image of a blue-gloved hand holding a miniature brain with rays of light shooting out.
  • Collage image of a computer with a brain image on the screen, surrounded by images of technology and nature, with the text: I wanted to be a part of a brain study because I wanted to help scientists learn about the brain. It also sounded fun and I knew I would get to see pictures of what my brain looks like! Plus, helping the scientists learn about brains means that they can be better at helping people with sick brains and keeping everyone's brain healthy! I also got paid :)
    Collage image of a computer with a brain image on the screen, surrounded by images of technology and nature, with the text: I wanted to be a part of a brain study because I wanted to help scientists learn about the brain. It also sounded fun and I knew I would get to see pictures of what my brain looks like! Plus, helping the scientists learn about brains means that they can be better at helping people with sick brains and keeping everyone's brain healthy! I also got paid 🙂
  • Collage image: A statue in a pink wig looks into a computer screen filled with peaches into a pair of eyes. They are in a natural setting with butterflies. Text: The first day a woman named Jen met me and my mom at the hospital. We both signed papers saying it was ok for the scientists to look at my brain. Then I did a pretend MRI session. Jen told me that an MRI scanner uses magnets and radio waves to take pictures of the brain. The magnets are very strong: 50,000 times earth's magnetic field or three Teslas! After the pretend scan, we walked over to another building and I played some computer games and did some paperwork.
  • Image: model in loose-fitting clothing reclines on an abstracted MRI scanner. Text: On my second day I got to go into the real scanner! I couldn't wear any metal because of the strong magnets. I lay down and tried to keep my head very very still. If I moved even a centimeter (the length of a pencil eraser) then the pictures of my brain would be blurry and the scientists wouldn't be able to use them. The scanner made beep beep boop and humming sounds. While I was in the scanner I watched a movie and played some more games.
  • Image: head facing left with brightly colored brain collaged on top. A large neuron is pasted over the head. Text: The third and final session we did something called an EEG scan. I put on a funny cap that measures electrical signals in my brain while I played computer games. Then I spit in a tube and they cut out a tiny piece of my hair. These are for genetic and hormone analysis, so the scientists are looking at how my body is coded and what chemicals it is producing.
  • Image: gloved hand holding tiny brain that is radiating light. text: I had fun during these three visits. The scientists told me that if I want to come back again, I can do the same study in 18 months. It is longitudinal, meaning they are looking at how peoples brains change over time. Isn't it great that you can help the scientists and people with sick brains and have fun at the same time!